Nigerian FG plans massive security recruitments

Oct 1st, 2011 – Senate President David Mark has asked Nigerians not to despair over the current challenges of underdeveloped insecurity in Nigeria because there will be light at the end of the tunnel.

Mark, in his message to the nation at her 51st independence anniversary, said the government plans massive recruitment into the different security agencies to boost the nation’s security profile.

He added that the government also plans  regular training of security operatives, adequate appropriation to agencies, enlightenment and community participation in surveillance in order to curb the growing insecurity in the nation.

He admitted the challenges of insecurity facing the nation and said it is an unfortunate phase in our nationhood, “which we must collectively rise to surmount.”

The senate president assured Nigerians that in spite of the challenges of nationhood including threat to security, Nigeria will remain united and unbreakable.

“We had the unfortunate experience of over 30-months old fratricidal civil war, fought with much hate and bitterness, but by sheer providence, we came out of it and picked our pieces,” he said.  “It is a sad commentary we hate to remember. But this fresh security challenge largely fuelled by aggrieved youths and some extremists is one trouble too many.”

Mark argued that dialogue is the best approach for reaching agreements with the various aggrieved youth groups armed against the government. Recently, many politicians have begun to call for dialogue with militia groups in the country as a way of ending the incessant bombing campaign in the country.

“We can only appeal to the conscience of the aggrieved to sheathe their swords, embrace dialogue so that we can all find a common solution to our common problem rather than resort to violence,” he said. “Whatever the anger or misgivings, dialogue and resort to defined channels of communication remain the best option. We must do more to reignite the African spirit of being our brothers’ keeper.”

The previous day, the senate president had admitted the country was not developing as fast as its potentials. He said Nigeria was 50 years behind civilization comparatively with its former peers – Brazil and India. 

“All we need do as a people is to develop where we have comparative advantage over others so that we can build an egalitarian society, a prosperous nation, where no one or group would feel cheated or marginalized,” he said.